Primera Parte de la Chronica avgvstiniana (Agustiniana) de Mechoacan

  • $950.00
    Unit price per 


Author: Gonzalez de la Puente, Juan (1580-16?) from the library of Professor George M Foster

Year: 1909

Publisher: Tip. de R.C. Miranda

Place: Mexico City

Description:

509+ix pages. Octavo (8 3/4" x 6 1/2") bound in half leather with raised spine bands and marbled boards, gilt lettering to spine. Published under the direction of Bishop Plancarte y Navarrete, with a brief bibliographical note by Nicolas Leon. From the library of George Foster. Second edition.

Juan Gonzalez de la Puente, born a Spaniard in 1580, undertook to chronicle the Augustinians in Michoacan and to write the lives of nine "apostolic varones". Part 1 of his Chronica appeared not long after its composition about 1623. In 1630 the chapter meeting of his province in Tiripitio, Michoacan, authorized him to publish the second part, but no trace of part 2 has to date been uncovered. In the extant manuscript, he wrote the biographies of the nine friars, scattered over three books. They are Juan Bautista de Moya, Juan de Median Rincon, Diego de Chaves, Sebastian de Trasierra, Francisco de Acosta, Juan de Montalvo, Francisco Lopez, Pedro de Vera and Diego de Villarubia. As a matter of fact, none of these belonged to the Michoacan province, but were from Santisimo Nombre in Mexico City; but as they had been active in Michoacan, before the latter was an officially established province, Puente included them. Book 1 contains no lives of these men, but instead is devoted to a wide range of topics. Among them is the discovery of the New World, the conquest of Mexico, and Augustinian activities in Mexico after arrival, as well as in Persia and the Orient. Book 2 contains biographies of the first five missionaries and recounts, in entire chapters, Augustinian efforts among the Indians of Michoacan as well as to missions in China and Japan. The remaining four missionaries appear in book 3, which completes the account (to his times) of the Augustinian ministry to the Tarascans. At the edge of the text Puente indicates his main sources. His ideas are easy to follow, but occasionally he lapses into a diffuse style, especially when extolling the virtues of his brethren. He also has a predilection for the unusual and the extraordinary. His Choronica of Michoacan appeared in the same year (1624) as Grijalva's of Mexico, although the latter province had been founded some 67 years earlier. A relative rare work, the 1624 edition of which this was reissue.

George McClelland Foster, Jr born in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, on October 9, 1913, died on May 18, 2006, at his home in the hills above the campus of the University of California, Berkeley, where he served as a professor from 1953 to his retirement in 1979, when he became professor emeritus. His contributions to anthropological theory and practice still challenge us; in more than 300 publications, his writings encompass a wide diversity of topics, including acculturation, long-term fieldwork, peasant economies, pottery making, public health, social structure, symbolic systems, technological change, theories of illness and wellness, humoral medicine in Latin America, and worldview. The quantity, quality, and long-term value of his scholarly work led to his election to the National Academy of Sciences in 1976. Virtually all of his major publications have been reprinted and/or translated. Provenance from the executor of Foster's library laid in.

Condition:

Spine sunned, some shelf wear and fore edge wear, points rubbed, pages age toned, George Foster's stamp to title and date of acquire on front else about very good.

Kemper

We Also Recommend